Gastric Bypass Diet – Saving Severe Cases of Obesity

Gastric Bypass Diet helps those people who has undergone gastric bypass surgery. The process of stoping excessive eating does not stop in that surgery. Diet is also needed for it to be successful.

Gastric bypass is a type of surgery in which the stomach is reduced in size by one of several methods. This smaller stomach is then reconnected or bypassed to the small intestine. Having a gastric bypass can help speed weight loss by making it difficult to eat too much food at one time and to feel satisfied after very small meals.
After a gastric bypass, the volume that the new, smaller stomach can hold is reduced from about 1 quart to about 1 ounce, or 2 tablespoons. Over time, the stomach pouch will stretch until it can hold 4 to 8 ounces, or about 1/2 to 1 cup, at a time. The size of the opening created between the stomach and small intestine is smaller too, roughly 1/4 inch wide, which slows the rate at which food is emptied from the stomach into the small intestine.
Gastric bypass is usually performed only after many other methods of weight loss have been tried and failed. However, the surgery is not an end in itself. It is important to work closely with a physician and registered dietitian (R.D.) to start a program of new eating habits to ensure that weight loss is safe and successful. A regular, simple exercise program and psychological support are often recommended to create a better self-image and a whole new attitude toward food.

Gastric bypass is a type of surgery in which the stomach is reduced in size by one of several methods. This smaller stomach is then reconnected or bypassed to the small intestine. Having a gastric bypass can help speed weight loss by making it difficult to eat too much food at one time and to feel satisfied after very small meals.
After a gastric bypass, the volume that the new, smaller stomach can hold is reduced from about 1 quart to about 1 ounce, or 2 tablespoons. Over time, the stomach pouch will stretch until it can hold 4 to 8 ounces, or about 1/2 to 1 cup, at a time. The size of the opening created between the stomach and small intestine is smaller too, roughly 1/4 inch wide, which slows the rate at which food is emptied from the stomach into the small intestine.
Gastric bypass is usually performed only after many other methods of weight loss have been tried and failed. However, the surgery is not an end in itself. It is important to work closely with a physician and registered dietitian (R.D.) to start a program of new eating habits to ensure that weight loss is safe and successful. A regular, simple exercise program and psychological support are often recommended to create a better self-image and a whole new attitude toward food.

~ by mirksmith on June 6, 2010.

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